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Why a Central Auckland Office Location Matters to Grow Your Business

Why a Central Auckland Office Location Matters to Grow Your Business

The location of your office has a direct impact on the long-term success of your company. Therefore it’s important that you are selective about your businesses location to create the environment that will set you up for success. Since Auckland is the largest city in New Zealand, it’s easy to see why business owners like having permanent office space in this area. But, you need to consider different things when you are selecting an office space. These are a few points to think about before you sign the contract: Accessibility Whether you will be meeting with clients or you only need space for your employees, it’s essential to be sure that the office space can be easily accessed. Consider the office proximity to Britomart, public transportation, and parking areas. If people have difficulty with transportation, then it will seem burdensome for them to come to your office. Accessibility matters, because it impacts the experience people have when they come to your office. If you want to grow your business, then you need to find a place that is easy to access and easy to find. Check the Auckland public transport maps to be sure that your new business location is near a stop. In any city centre, foot traffic is an important method of transportation. Being too far away or tucked away in a hard-to-find location means that people might pass up your company and go to a competitor instead. Make sure that your office space is well marked and customers/clients can arrive using any method of transportation that works best for them. Proximity to City Center How close...
7 Tips for Being a Successful Freelancer

7 Tips for Being a Successful Freelancer

Working as a freelancer is not always easy, especially if you’re at the beginning of your freelance career. If you’re ready to be your own boss, there are a few things you need to know in order to be successful but maintain your independence. Being a freelancer myself, I wish I knew the following motivation tips when I was first starting. Applying them, I’ve seen major progress and I hope you can pick some value from them, no matter where you’re at with your freelance career. Brand yourself Focusing your freelance business is the first important thing. I know many freelancers who are stuck struggling to get their name out there, but can’t seem to find enough work. It will be much easier for you if you focus your brand identity and the type of projects you accept. Pick one or two services in which you’ll specialise and only accept work that falls into those categories. Once you’ve decided what you specialise in, be sure to make that your brand. Start producing content around those services in order to be able to prove your expertise to clients. Network When you first start working as an independent contractor, no one knows you. What you’ll need to do is networking – it is the key to thrive. Send emails, call potential clients, go to events where you might meet new clients. Whats more important is doing it constantly. It’s never too late to expand your network. At the beginning it wasn’t easy for me either. I didn’t feel comfortable approaching and selling myself to others, but I soon realised it was...
Why Entrepreneurs need 4 types of Mentors

Why Entrepreneurs need 4 types of Mentors

In my last post, I wrote about how I have relied on my parents and business mentors for advice and coaching during the building of Alike.   I didn’t mention how much I have also learnt to value good friends over the past few years and how a good friend is worth their weight in gold when you are feeling overwhelmed. I am privileged to have several close friends who have been amazing support during this building process. To me, they have been number 3 on my list of mentors and the list is not in priority order.   I recently realised how I was missing a 4th kind of mentor. Since my last post, I reached out to a guy I had met only once but knew had sold his share in a large serviced office business he and his team built from the ground up. Let’s refer to him as, John (so he doesn’t get hassled).   I was definitely nervous about  reaching out to John. I had nothing to offer so thought there was no way he would help out a guy he barely knows with insights and knowledge he had built up over 5 years of hard work.   What convinced me to do so was: 1. Being tired of stabbing in the dark and the growth curve seeming painfully slow 2. Realising my lack of specific job experience was what made my experimenting take so long 3. Reading this article.   So I gave it a shot and he responded in the best way possible.   John suggested to meet face to face and came and...
Mentors. From Parents to Successful Entrepreneurs.

Mentors. From Parents to Successful Entrepreneurs.

Starting up Alike, I have predominantly looked to my parents when I have faced difficult decisions. I haven’t had the money to pay an experienced professional consultant so my parents were my best first option and I am extremely grateful for the advice they have given.   As time goes on, I appreciate more and more the advice of people with experience. Whether it is my parents, business mentors, experts I outsource work to or members of Alike.   My father is an entrepreneur at heart. He lives in Havelock North with his partner Francie where they run several small businesses. They run Hawkes Bay’s largest window cleaning company, a Boutique (self catering) Accommodation business and have recently purchased a commercial property as an investment. He is not a stereotypical “rich” person but to me he lives a very rich life as he has what a lot of people never get – time. He has designed a lifestyle for himself over the years that works for him and his advice is really appreciated.   My Mum has worked lots of different jobs over the years (hospitality, real estate, administration) and completed a BA at Victoria University as a mature student. She has currently been working at Plunket NZ head office for approximately 8 years. Mum has no direct business experience on paper so would seem the least likely to give good advice but this has far from been the case – backed up by this Economist Report. Mum has been there for me through the tough times more than any body else with words of wisdom and logical encouragement so...
Self-discipline in Business – Do you practice it?

Self-discipline in Business – Do you practice it?

Self-discipline is defined by the Oxford Dictionary as “the ability to control ones feelings and overcome one’s weaknesses.”   I was born in 1985 and I think I am part of a generation that has lacked being disciplined as children. We are part of the freedom of speech, women’s rights, gay marriage, Obama for president era. This is all fantastic and I wouldn’t have it any other way. Our parents have also bred a generation of children that have been raised to believe they can be anything and everything they want to be. This is also great. I plan on teaching my children the same thing. However, a friend said to me the other night, “we are a generation raised by women” and I think this also rings some truth and would help explain some things.   What has been lacking in our era is the lesson of consequences – regular disciplinary reminders.   If you choose to take path A, there will be a consequence for your action that you may or may not be prepared for. Sometimes the lessons come hard. Sometimes they come easy and are only exciting. The latter being the hopeful outcome but often the best lessons can be learnt from the former so shouldn’t be feared. What I see a lot with startups and small businesses is people completely loosing confidence in themselves after their first big knock down. If you are roughly my age (many startup founders and employees are), you may have simply missed the boat with disciplinary lessons from your parent/s too. Maybe you are or maybe you aren’t my age. It doesn’t...
My Shared Space Startup. Chapter 4 – Keeping Faith.

My Shared Space Startup. Chapter 4 – Keeping Faith.

I decided that if I wanted to chase the sound design dream, I needed some kind of passive income to counteract the heavy downturns in the industry. My initial resolution was to start an espresso bar down town in Auckland. This is where my other experience lay and there was opportunity in the market. The plan: Set up a coffee shop, start pumping out lots of coffee, then step back and have staff run it. I would then have money and time to work on films. It sounds like a lot of work now, yet at the time it was a better idea than my previous situation so I pushed forward and started the hunt for a location. I purchased a people counter online (like the ones bouncers have at bars) and sat outside several different vacant spots downtown at 7am for a couple of hours counting the foot traffic. I remember the looks on some peoples faces. “What is that guy up to?” is what they were thinking and I was wondering the same thing. I got excited about a location several times, yet reality would hit after finding out the rent. The idea then became to shrink the size of the space I would rent. Again, finding a “whole in the wall” space available was a different story. I progressed to contemplating splitting a large ground floor space. I thought it wouldn’t hurt to ring landlords and ask if they were prepared to rent me a section of their premise. As I predicted, the responses were all a quick no. However, the process led me to one landlord who...